cats

Best Way To Transport Cats Cross Country

If you find moving stressful, consider what it’s like for the family cat. The household pet is sure to sense that something dramatic is afoot with all the packing, boxing and activity that accompanies any move.

Since animals are creatures of habit, you will want to maintain your household routine when planning to transport a cat across the country.

Feed your cat at the same time regardless of the moving madness. Play with your cat as you always do. Maintain the same order and routine. Be sure to give your cat the same level of attention and affection throughout the entire moving process.

Always focus on pet safety. Consider some of these tips before the movers arrive.

Ask a neighbor, relative or friend to look after the kitty

Moving day is going to be chaotic, and you don’t need a frantic cat scurrying around the house, getting into boxes and maybe getting outside. Find out if your pet can visit a friend or an animal daycare center to stay clear of the movers. Another easy option is to clear a room and let your cat relax in private while your belongings are packed and hauled away by movers. Put cat toys in the room, or anything your cat cares about. You might want to block off the room or let the movers know not to enter that part of the house.

Cat Safety is Key

Before hitting the road, it’s best to get your cat used to car travel. Not all cats like cars, so take a few practice trips to get your pet familiar with the road. Invest in a quality pet carrier. You will not want a loose cat roaming inside your car as you navigate the road. If your cat is especially nervous, speak to your family veterinarian and ask about any medications that might calm your pet during the road trip.

Prepare a travel kit for your pet

One of the best ways to address the issue of moving a cat across the country involves preparing a travel kit for the kitty. Pack up your cat’s favorite foods, treats, toys, water bowls, and blanket. These items will remind your pet of home and help keep him or her at ease along the road.

Consider traveling only during the day. Cats are nocturnal by nature. They will be calmer during the day. You should also map out your road trip in advance and seek out cat friendly hotels.

Pack the car with the cat crate in mind

Your cat’s crate should be properly secured for the long drive. Most crates can be secured to the floorboard or a seatbelt. Be sure there’s plenty of airflow in the crate. Try to place the crate so your cat can look out and see you.

Don’t over feed or over water your pet

Cats can get car sick, so don’t over feed the animal. You can give your cat a larger meal once you have stopped for the night.

The litter box issue

You will want to bring along your litter box. Be sure to have a litter box with a lid. Look into getting a litter box that can fit into your cat’s travel carrier if possible. Don’t forget to bring extra litter and a scooper. Toss in some plastic bags to assist with the litter box cleaning.

Flying with your cat

If you decide to fly to your new home with your cat, be sure to map this out well in advance. Book the tickets soon. Find out everything you can about the airline’s cat policy. Bring all of your pet’s documents with you to the airport. Determine if the pet carrier you have meets the airline’s policies. And get to the airport at least two hours in advance.

If you have questions about moving a pet, or seek advice on relocating to Denver, Colorado Springs, Ft. Worth or Albuquerque, let Buehler help guide your process.